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Continuing Education Courses


CEU Courses

 
  • *Air Barrier 1 - Choices of Air Barriers for Commercial Building Enclosures* No Schedule Available

  • This seminar will help you understand the importance of air barriers on building enclosure performance, and the choices of air barrier systems for air leakage control. Based on the application method there are 4 main types of air barriers for commercial buildings: (i) Fluid-Applied Membranes (FA), (ii) Mechanically Fastened (Building Wraps), (iii) Self-Adhered Membranes (SA), and (iv) Spray Polyurethane Foams (SPF). Based on vapor permeability air barriers can be vapor permeable and non-permeable. This seminar will discuss air barrier choices based on the application method; vapor permeability is beyond the scope of this presentation. The seminar is organized in 2 main sections: 

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  • *Air Barrier 2 - Air Leakage Control in Commercial Building Enclosures* No Schedule Available

  • This seminar will review the impact of air leakage on building enclosure performance, current codes and standards for air leakage control and recent advances in implementing airtight buildings in practice. Air leakage is important because it can transport heat, moisture and contaminants through the building enclosure and can impact building energy performance, envelope durability and occupants’ comfort. A continuous air barrier is critical for air leakage control. ASHRAE 90.1-2010 was the first code to introduce continuous air barriers as a mandatory requirement. Air barrier performance requirements which include air infiltration resistance, continuity, structural integrity and durability will be reviewed. Energy codes which regulate air barrier requirements will be highlighted along with the three compliance options: air barrier materials, assemblies and whole building airtightness. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) introduced the first air barrier program which requires blower door test for whole building airtightness. 

    The seminar is organized in 3 sections: − Section 1 will discuss the impact of air leakage on building enclosure performance − Section 2 will review the main air barrier requirements and air barrier codes − Section 3 will highlight the USACE air barrier program and a few examples of successful implementation of whole building airtightness testing

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  • *Durability 1 - Durable Building Enclosure Design* No Schedule Available

  • This seminar will outline recent changes in building energy codes and how these changes could impact the long range durability of the building enclosure.

    The seminar is divided into 3 sections: 1. The first section is a brief summary of recent changes in North America energy codes. The discussion is focused on the opaque building envelope criteria and the changes in wall assembly design as a result of energy code requirements. 2. The second section is a brief review of moisture analysis tools for building envelope design 3. The final section will provide examples of moisture analysis for typical framed walls. Moisture problems & moisture management strategies depend on climate and wall design and WUFI analysis must be climate specific. The US climates can be grouped into 3 broad categories: Cold climates (cz 5-8); Warm-Hot Humid climates (cz 1A-4A); Marine climates (4-5C). Section 3 is divided into 3A, 3B and 3C, to provide examples of the 3 climate types and to customize the presentation for regional needs 

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  • *E2357 vs. E1677 - Building Envelope Design Specs & Air Barrier Performance Level (ASTM E2357 vs. ASTM E1677)* No Schedule Available

  • This CEU describes the air barrier performance requirements for the desired wind load design specifications. There are two accepted performance levels for commercial air barrier systems, determined by the structural design parameters for the building envelope: ASTM E2357 and ASTM E1677.

    The seminar is organized in 4 Sections. 1. The first section is a brief review of air leakage and air barriers for air leakage control 2. The second section is a review of air barrier compliance options which include materials, assemblies, and whole building testing 3. The third section addresses the air barriers performance requirements versus design criteria 4. The final section provides examples of how installation details could impact air barrier performance level

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  • *Fluid 1 - Fluid Applied Air Barrier Membranes - Advances and Applications* [View Schedules and Register]

  • Continuous air barriers are essential for building’s energy efficiency, durability and indoor air quality and are currently required by energy codes. There are several types of air barriers commonly used in the industry including building wraps, self-adhered and fluid applied membranes. This presentation will discus fluid applied air barriers which continue to increase in popularity in recent years.

    The seminar is divided into four sections: − Section 1 is a brief overview of air leakage control and air barrier requirements and gives a general overview of fluid applied air barriers − Section 2 discusses performance properties which are specific to fluid applied air barrier materials and how chemistry could impact these properties − Section 3 describes how to specify fluid applied air barriers to meet your project performance requirements − Section 4 addresses training and installation principles, and provides example details and common installation mistakes for fluid applied air barriers The presentation will highlight key differences and performance advantages of new high performance chemical formulations in contrast to traditional fluid applied air barrier formulations. 

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  • *Green 1 - Sustainable Building Enclosure Design* No Schedule Available

  • Buildings use a significant percentage of energy and resources and are responsible for 40% of the world waste hence sustainable buildings have become an imperative. A sustainable building requires optimization of whole building performance through proper integration of its parts. This seminar will focus on building enclosure contribution to sustainable buildings. The building enclosure is typically designed for the life of the building, making it critical to address its sustainability at the design phase. Building enclosure sustainability attributes include energy efficiency, durability, IAQ and sustainable materials. Air leakage can transport heat, moisture and contaminants across the building enclosure and can affect all sustainability attributes. However air leakage impact has only recently been understood and continuous air barriers for air leakage control have become mandatory code requirements for the first time in ASHRAE 90.1- 2010.

    The seminar is organized in 4 sections. − Section 1 will briefly review the information to date on climate change and why sustainable buildings must be an essential part of mitigation measures. − Section 2 will review an overview of LEED v4 and changes to the rating system. − Section 3 will discuss the Importance of building enclosure design of air barriers on sustainability in the context of LEED v4. − Section 4 will summarize building envelope material sustainability and health in the context of LEED v4. 

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  • *HAM 101 - Heat, Air, and Moisture - Management in Commercial Building Enclosure* No Schedule Available

  • This seminar is a basic review of heat, air and moisture transport mechanisms across the building enclosure and the design control strategies. The first section will discus heat transport mechanisms and heat management. There are 3 main mechanisms of heat transport: conduction, convection and radiation. Heat flow by conduction (through materials) is discussed in the first section which includes a brief review of thermal insulation materials and energy code requirements for thermal insulation. Heat flow by convection (through air currents) is controlled with a Continuous Air Barrier. A summary review of the overall impact of air leakage on building enclosure performance and the importance of air leakage control is provided in the second section. Air leakage and Air Barriers are addressed in more details in other CES presentations by the same provider (Air Barrier-1 and Air Barrier-2). Heat flow by radiation (through space) is not discus in this seminar and it is more important for fenestration than for the opaque envelope. The last section is a brief review of moisture sources in buildings, moisture transport mechanisms, and moisture control strategies. The building science principles behind the moisture management are briefly discussed. Moisture management principles are addressed in more details in other CES presentations by the same provider (Moisture 1). 

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  • *Moisture 1 - Moisture Management in Commercial Building Enclosures* No Schedule Available

  • Moisture is the most significant factor in the premature deterioration of buildings. Moisture can damage materials directly, but it can also reduce the effectiveness of building materials. Excess moisture is also the major factor in the growth of mold.

    This seminar, organized in 3 sections, will help you understand the impact of moisture transport across the building enclosure and the importance of controlling moisture flow using water, air and vapor barriers. − Section 1 gives a summary of the impact and potential liabilities of moisture intrusion − Section 2 describes the main moisture sources, transport mechanisms and control strategies (The 3 Moisture Barriers) − Section 3 describes the differences between air and vapor barrier functions. Moisture transport by air currents and by vapor diffusion has different driving forces and occurs through different mechanisms; however the 2 control functions are often confused in the industry. 

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  • *NFPA 285 Assembly Test of Exterior Walls with Combustible Components* No Schedule Available

  • NFPA 285 is the Standard Fire Test Method for Evaluation of Fire Propagation Characteristics of Exterior Non-Load-Bearing Wall Assemblies Containing Combustible Components. NFPA 285 assembly tests are required when exterior non-combustible walls contain combustible components by the International Building Code (IBC). The scope of materials classified by the IBC requiring NFPA 285 testing is increasing. Combined with more stringent energy code requirements, the use of combustible materials is also growing in exterior walls. The most common contributing factors to non-compliance of designs requiring NFPA 285 assembly testing include: − Lack of understanding of applicability of test on exterior wall assemblies. − Recent building and energy code changes causing new triggers for the test. − Lack of understanding of assembly vs. product results for NFPA 285 tests. This seminar will discuss the impact of the NFPA 285 Test on buildings using IBC and ASHRAE 90.1 energy code requirements, the parameters and history of NFPA 285, and the definition of what building envelope components are combustible and require NFPA 285 testing by IBC. All of these elements combine to integrate NFPA 285 compliant assemblies into building envelope systems. 

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  • *RES1 - Managing Moisture in Residential Construction * No Schedule Available

  • The industry is increasing the energy efficiency of buildings, but a building cannot be truly efficient unless it is durable. As new materials and methods are introduced to meet higher energy efficiency standards, new construction methods and details will be required. This presentation will discuss the challenges in moisture management and durability posed by energy efficient wall systems. A significant amount of research has been conducted on traditional wall systems, leading to water-resistive barrier, drainage, window installation and flashing recommendations. This presentation will review water management code requirements and discuss how these established water management recommendations and code requirements relate to highly insulated and airtight wall assemblies. The implications of air barriers and vapor retarders on wall system moisture management and building durability will also be discussed.

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  • Do Not Use: Air Barrier 1 No Schedule Available

  • This seminar will help you understand the importance of air barriers on building enclosure performance, and the choices of air barrier systems for air leakage control. Based on the application method there are 4 main types of air barriers for commercial buildings: (i) Fluid-Applied Membranes (FA), (ii) Mechanically Fastened (Building Wraps), (iii) Self-Adhered Membranes (SA), and (iv) Spray Polyurethane Foams (SPF). Based on vapor permeability air barriers can be vapor permeable and non-permeable. This seminar will discuss air barrier choices based on the application method; vapor permeability is beyond the scope of this presentation. The seminar is organized in 2 main sections: 1. The first section is a very brief review of air leakage and the importance of air leakage control for commercial building enclosures. 2. The second section will address the following for each air barrier type: brief description, examples of products, typical properties, application methods, system components and advantages & limitations. Examples of proper field installation and common mistakes will be outlined for each air barrier type.

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Continuing Education Learning Units

Design and construction professionals earn AIA Continuing Education learning units by completing courses on Tyvek BKU, and answering test questions at the end of each course.

Important: All Tyvek BKU CE presentation courses may count towards the AIA continuing education requirement. All active registered architect AIA members may complete their annually required Continuing Education Credits through Tyvek BKU. This includes all 18 Continuing Education Hours (CEHs) each year. Of the 18 CEHs, 12 hours must address health, safety, and welfare (HSW).

AIA Member Requirements

 

LEED professionals earn Green Building Certification Institute’s (GBCI) Continuing Education hours to fulfill LEED credential maintenance requirements by reading designated articles and sponsored sections on this site, and answering test questions at the end of each course.

Learn more about GBCI's Credential Maintenance Program

View LEED Credential Maintenance Requirements

 

Credit Reporting Instructions

AIA Credit Reporting

Depending on when you take a course online on Tyvek BKU, it can take between 1 to 2 weeks for your credits to appear on your AIA member transcript. For example, if you take a course on a Monday, your credits will appear on your transcript by Thursday of the following week. Please check your transcript regularly for updates.

GBCI Credit Reporting

GBCI Credential Maintenance Program participants must self-report their GBCI CE hours through “My Credentials” at www.gbci.org. Keep a copy of your certificate of completion for your records.

View instructions for reporting GBCI CE Hours